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Graduate Commencement

Etiquette

Regalia

Lewis & Clark follows the guidance of the American Council on Education’s Academic Costume Code in determining the regalia appropriate for the graduate school’s annual commencement ceremony.

Based on the origins of academic dress from the 12th and 13th centuries, the modern costume code in the United States was first established in 1859. In 1932, oversight of the code moved to the American Council on Education with updates in 1959 and again in 1986.

Regalia Adornments

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS—HONORING UNIQUE TRIBAL CULTURE

American Indian and Alaska Native students may wear regalia adornments that honor their unique tribal culture. Adornments may include eagle feathers or other culturally significant items.

HONOR CORDS

Honor cords may be provided by professional organizations or academic societies in a student’s field-of-study to indicate active participation by and membership of the student. Students should contact these organizations directly to inquire about the availability and ordering of honor cords. Honor cords do not denote GPA recognition.

AMERICANA CORDS

Americana cords are provided by the graduate school to students who have served as members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Contact the Graduate Registrar’s office for details.

STOLES, PROFESSIONAL/ACADEMIC AND HERITAGE

Students may choose to wear stoles offered by professional organizations or academic societies in their field-of-study. Students should contact these organizations directly to inquire about the availability and ordering of professional stoles.

Students may choose to wear stoles reflecting their cultural heritage, sexual orientation, or religious affiliation. Heritage stoles can be ordered by students through a variety of vendors including PrideSash.

Honoring the Flag
Title 36, Subtitle I, Part A section 301 United States Code – National Anthem

(a) Designation.— The composition consisting of the words and music known as the Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem.
(b) Conduct During Playing.— During a rendition of the national anthem—

  • (1) when the flag is displayed—

(A) individuals in uniform should give the military salute at the first note of the anthem and maintain that position until the last note;
(B) members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute in the manner provided for individuals in uniform; and
(C) all other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, and [those who identify as male] not in uniform, if applicable, should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; and

  • (2) when the flag is not displayed, all present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed.
Invocation

It is customary for those who identify as male to remove their headdress during both the national anthem and the invocation.

Children at the Ceremony

Children are welcome to attend the commencement ceremony. Because sitting still-and-quiet for two-plus hours can be a challenge for the best of us, please note that the ceremony may be televised live in the foyer. There is also plenty of room just outside the Pamplin Sports Center doors for supervised children to explore.

During the ceremony, itself, we welcome friends and family of our graduates, of all ages, to watch and celebrate with joy the hooding ceremony of their graduate from the audience. Following the ceremony, the reception provides a wonderful opportunity for guests to then join with their graduates in person to truly celebrate the momentous occasion.

Family Pets

We adore our dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, and rodents, too, but we kindly request that you leave your family pets at home the day of the commencement ceremony. (Pets are not allowed in the Pamplin Sports Center and there are no pet-safe areas available immediately outside of the arena.)

Graduate Commencement

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