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Continuing Education

Growing Up Policed: Surveilling Racialized Sexualities

Date: 11:00am - 5:00pm PDT December 1, 2011 PST Location: University of Oregon in Downtown Portland - Rooms 142 & 144, 70 NW Couch Street, Portland, OR

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University of Oregon in Downtown Portland - Rooms 142 & 144, 70 NW Couch Street, Portland, OR

**Please note new location for this event**

This daylong conference uses a recent legal case that occurred in Portland, Oregon to highlight how young people marginalized through sexuality and race are targeted. We discuss the context of “Growing Up Policed” and focus attendees on organizing future responses. To that end, this conference offers presenters who describe the relationship between youth, marginalization, the Prison Industrial Complex and technology, followed by a world-premier screening of the mini-documentary film, “Unlawful Justice: The Story of Antjuanece and Jolene”.

The screening is followed by a panel discussion of leading attorneys who work on the national front lines of LGBT law. This conference concludes with a local organizing session about how young people, activists, and scholars can network to keep young people safe in the nexus of education, technology, justice and constructions of racialized sexuality.

The afternoon program is specifically intended for LGBT young people, scholars, activists and concerned allies. We invite youth to listen to other young people about their experiences growing up policed. We ask for the voices of young adults and LGBT allies who have made the safety and rights of LGBT people a priority.  We encourage you to contribute to how we, as a community of concerned citizens, will network and provide a safety net for the next “Antjuanece Brown.”

This exciting new conference format will include live, interactive discussion between participants at Lewis & Clark College, University of Oregon, and City University of New York.

Conference objectives include:

  • What is happening at the intersection of policed queer youth’s sexuality and the disciplinary production of knowledge about them, e.g. the psychologizing and criminalization of sexuality?
  • How is race deployed to facilitate the surveillance and punishment of youth sexuality in cyber technologies, neighborhoods, and academia?
  • What are the connections between the present constructions of sexuality with the legal and discursive treatments throughout United States’ history?
  • What dynamic resistance(s) do community members/organizations take part in?
  • How do resistance(s) connect to the experience of our local leader-activists?
  • How might we think about what collective resistance(s) looks like within the broad range of policing activities that conference participants are aware of?
  • How might this conference foster sustainable communication and activism by uniting across interests and critiques?

Growing Up Policed aims to address the overarching question of how queer youth of color and their allies use their allies, their communities, and themselves to help their relationships and themselves to safely flourish.

Program

11-11:05 a.m.
Welcome and Introductions

11:05-11:25 a.m.
Criminalizing Race, Sexuality, and Youth
, Michael Hames-Garcia, Ph.D., Professor, Ethnic Studies, University of Oregon

11:25-11:45 a.m.
Framing the Issues
, Flor Bermudez, J.D., Lambda Legal

11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Cyberspace, Youth, Technology,
 Juanita Bell, John Jay College, CUNY; Jessie Daniels, Public Health Department, Hunter College, CUNY; and Gregory Donovan, Environmental Psychology, Graduate Center CUNY

12:30-12:45 p.m.
Break

12:45-2 p.m.
Institutional Conversations: Resisting the Criminalization of Youth, Sexuality, and Race,
 Michelle Maher, Ph.D. candidate, Instructor of Counseling Psychology, Lewis & Clark Graduate School of Education and Counseling.

“Unlawful Justice: The Story of Antjuanece and Jolene” mini-documentary screening.

Panel discussion with youth in NYC and Portland, OR. Moderators: Michelle Maher, Ph.D. candidate, Antjuanece Brown, and Jolene Jenkins.

2-3:15 p.m.
National Legal LGBT Landscape Panel
Angela Ritchie, Attorney, Streetwise and Safe; Charisa K. Smith, J.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor, Children’s Studies Program CUNY and Staff Attorney, Advocates for Children of New York; Kate Kendell, J.D., Executive Director, National Center for Lesbian Rights; Sarah Valentine, J.D., Director of Student Affairs and Associate Professor, CUNY School of Law.

3:15-3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30-4:45 p.m.
Community Organizing and the Arts
: Concurrent Sessions

4:45-5 p.m.
Closing

Presenters

Flor Bermudez, J.D., Attorney, Lambda Legal; Antjuanece Brown, undergraduate student, Portland, OR; Aimee M. Cox, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Performance and African American Studies, Fordham University; Jessie Daniels, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Urban Public Health, Hunter College, CUNY; Gregory Donovan, Ph.D. candidate, Environmental Psychology, CUNY Graduate Center; Michael Hames-Garcia, Ph.D., Professor of Ethnic Studies Education, University of Oregon; Jolene Jenkins, Portland, OR; Kate Kendell, J.D., Executive Director, National Center for Lesbian Rights; Michelle Maher, Ph.D. candidate, Instructor of Counseling Psychology, Lewis & Clark Graduate School of Education and Counseling; Darnell Moore, Director of Educational Initiatives, The Hetrick-Martin Institute; Andrea Ritchie, Attorney, Streetwise & Safe; Charisa K. Smith, J.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor, Children’s Studies Program CUNY, Staff Attorney, Advocates for Children of New York; and Sarah Valentine, J.D., Director of Student Affairs, Associate Professor CUNY School of Law.

This event is FREE and open to the public. If you plan to join us, please RSVP below. Participants will receive a confirmation letter with transportation information and other logistical details the week prior to the event.

Our office has a limited number of Trimet vouchers for community members who do not have access to our campus.  Please contact our office by November 11th at the latest to request a Trimet voucher.

Questions or need more information? Please contact the Center for Community Engagement at 503-768-6040 or cce@lclark.edu.

Co-sponsored by the Lewis & Clark Graduate School of Education and Counseling Center for Community Engagement, and the Lewis & Clark Gender Studies and Ethnic Studies Programs.

45.523939; -122.670915